Maid of Honor Toasts

Amy Hoover
Cheers!

While many of your maid of honor duties are done "behind the scenes," maid of honor toasts is one area where you will be in front of the spotlight for a few moments. Proper preparation is key in making the moment memorable and touching for the bride, groom, and guests.

Toast Writing Tips

Writing a toast is not always the easiest thing to do for many women. Even if you are the maid of honor and sister of the bride or her very best friend, you may find yourself at a loss for words when it comes to the toast. Try following these pointers when writing your toast:

  • Introduce yourself to the guests and tell them your relationship to the bride.
  • Offer a short memory or two of the bride in her youth.
  • Mention both the bride and the groom in the toast. While most of the toast is directed towards the bride, you should remember to offer congratulations to both of them.
  • Write how you speak. This is not the time to be following proper essay or report writing guidelines. You want the words to sound natural when you say them aloud.

Even though you want to write your full toast out, do not bring the entire copy to the wedding reception. Instead, write down a few key points that will help you remember each topic.

Speaking Tips for Toasting

Once you have written your speech, you need to practice giving your speech. Not everyone is a natural public speaker, so a little practice will go a long way. Try rehearsing your maid of honor speech and toast in the following ways:

  • Take a few sips of water before standing to speak. You do not want to have cottonmouth or a cough while talking.
  • Smile while you are giving the toast. The wedding is a happy occasion.
  • Look at the guests, but remember to glance at the bride, too. Look at the bride and groom if addressing them personally.
  • Feel free to use some hand gestures if you naturally do when speaking; otherwise, keep your hands at your side, resting on a podium/table or hold a glass.

If you are incredibly uncomfortable with public speaking, talk to the bride. She may not feel strongly about having the maid of honor give a long-winded speech. Options you could present include saying the opening and closing remarks for the toast or handing over the duty to a bridesmaid who is more naturally suited to being in the spotlight. However, wedding speeches are a tradition for maids of honor, so be prepared to deliver at least a short wedding toast.

Finales for Maid of Honor Toasts

The end of the speech, or finale, is where you actually raise your glass in honor of the bride and groom. Commonly used phrases for the toasting portion of the evening include:

  • Please raise your glasses in honor of Bride and Groom.
  • Join me in honoring the marriage of Bride and Groom!
  • With love and happiness, here's to you, Bride and Groom!
  • Cheers to the happy newlyweds! May you love each other more every day you spend together!
  • Let us toast the happiness of Bride with her new husband, Groom!
  • Best wishes and years of bliss to the new couple!
  • What a wonderful wedding day indeed, so let's raise our glasses to wherever their lives may lead.

Even if you do not drink wine or champagne, have a glass ready to raise at the end of your speech. This way, everyone understands that the speech is over and they are ready to toast the bride. Pick up the glass a few moments before ending the toast and then raise your outstretched arm to eye level. Take a sip of your drink after completing the whole toast.


Giving maid of honor toasts is a tradition honored at many weddings. Offer the bride and her new husband wedding wishes in a toast that honors the new life they are embarking upon.

Maid of Honor Toasts